Fruits and vegetables generate ethylene gas while they ripen. As some fruits and vegetables produce more ethylene gas than others, it is important to store them separately from those that are very sensitive to ethylene. Leafy vegetables are very sensitive to ethylene, even in very low quantities. Lettuce, for example, begins to decay when exposed to ethylene gas at low temperatures. Products sensitive to ethylene gas, such as broccoli and bananas, spoil quickly if stored in the same areas as avocados, melons, and apples, which produce high levels of ethylene. See lists below for fruits and vegetables that create ethylene at high levels and those that are most affected by ethylene. Also, see link below for an easy to use storage chart.

  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Avocados
  • Ripening bananas
  • Blueberries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Citrus fruit (not grapefruit)
  • Cranberries
  • Figs Guavas
  • Grapes
  • Green onions
  • Honeydew
  • Ripe kiwis
  • Mangoes
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Okra
  • Papayas
  • Passion fruit
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peppers
  • Persimmons
  • Pineapple
  • Plantains
  • Plums
  • Prunes
  • Quinces
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelons
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Chard
  • Cucumbers
  • Cut flowers
  • Eggplants
  • Endive
  • Escarole
  • Florist greens
  • Green beans
  • Kale Kiwis
  • Leafy greens
  • Lettuce
  • Parsley
  • Peas
  • Peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Potted plants
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Watercress
  • Yams

 

 

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